Web Studio Pictures with Wrapping Text

Sometimes you may want to place a small image in with your text,
this is one way you can do that. What I'm going to show you is how to use the code web studio makes, amend it then place that into a text object.

There is a better way to do this but I think this will be easiest
for those of you that don't know html that well and we can use web studio to resize the images. It does make for a few extra steps though.

Open a new page, (which you can delete later) use Insert Protected Graphic to place your image. We do that on a blank page so it's easy to find the code we'll use.

Click on it and use the corner handle to drag it in towards the center so it will resize equally to make the image the size you want

While still on the new page right click on the page from that menu select view source, look for this html code. 

<div id="SGROBJ7DD341CF1F2725C1" style=" position:absolute; top:419px; left:145px; width:155px; height:209px; z-index:11;" >
<img src="_RefFiles/want.jpg" width=55 height=74 border=0 alt="">
</div>

want.jpg will be the name of the image that you used. 
You are going to use that line I higlighted in red later for your text object
 

Now that you have resized the image and have the code ready on the page you want the text
with an image
put the text object like you always do and type in your text.

Web Studio - Images with wrapping Text - by Web Studio Next

The "I Want You" poster was drawn by one of the nation's most successful illustrators at the time James Montgomery Flagg. It was the summer of 1916 and Flagg under a deadline working on a cover drawing for Leslie's Illustrated Weekly Newspaper. He used himself as the model and in all likelihood borrowed from the British Poster (left) of Lord Kitchener with the words "Your country needs You". The picture ran on the cover of the July 16, 1916, issue of Leslie's under the heading "What Are You Doing for Preparedness?" then in the spring of 1917 reappeared, this time on a World War I U.S. Army recruiting poster, with its caption restored as "I WANT YOU."

This is what it will look like when floated right in a text object when you preview

Copy the image from the blank page,  and paste it on your new page.
Click on it, then on the HTML tab in Insert Object HTML select Inside Object and paste this code.

Style="display:none;"

That gives us the picture to use later in the text, and the style hides it from visitors.
So it doesn't matter where you put this picture no one will see it but you.

Select your text, then on the Text tab in Clipboard select Edit HTML and paste the code
from the blank page we looked at earlier.

One last step. Now we amend that code so that our image will either "float" left or to the right
and add some margin space so use Edit HTML again and put either one of the
float and margin code from below and paste  it in before the last flag which is this >

To float right copy / paste this:

To float left copy / paste this:

style="MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 8px; FLOAT: right"

style="MARGIN: 0px 8px 0px 0px; FLOAT: left"

The margin space is MARGIN: top right bottom left; if you want to add more

So that code will look like this below, (WS changes it but it still works) and you have to
PREVIEW to see the image, in WS you'll see a box with an x where the image will be

The "I Want You" poster (left) was drawn by one of the nation's most successful illustrators at the time James Montgomery Flagg. It was the summer of 1916 and Flagg under a deadline working on a cover drawing for Leslie's Illustrated Weekly Newspaper. He used himself as the model and in all likelihood borrowed from the British Poster of Lord Kitchener (right) with the words "Your country needs You". The picture ran on the cover of the July 16, 1916, issue of Leslie's under the heading "What Are You Doing for Preparedness?" then in the spring of 1917 reappeared, this time on a World War I U.S. Army recruiting poster, with its caption restored as "I WANT YOU."

You can also use both, float left and float right like below.

LINKS

These tutorials are quite a lot of work
thank-you for your appreciation.

Thank-you!

These effects are not officially part of Web Studio
If you have questions see the custom coding page

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